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THE SUPPLIER

We source Brazil nut oil from the Candela not-for-profit Fair Trade organisation. Founded in 1989, it provides employment for over 100 women. Candela aims to empower small producers and communities, strengthen organisations and increase their capacity to improve living standards and conserve the biodiversity of the region.

THE COMMUNITY

Peru’s Brazil nut trade provides an environmentally-friendly alternative to unsustainable income sources, helping to sustain the Amazon rainforest. The Castaneros who collect the Brazil nuts help protect the environment so the trees and forest can thrive.

DON JUSTA'S STORY

Dona has a concession consisting of 360 Brazil nut trees. Her earnings from the nuts help build poultry stocks and fish ponds, which she breeds and sells. In 2011 she set up her own chicken rotisserie restaurant and employs barriqueros from the sierra to harvest the Brazil nuts.

THE ONLY PLACE FRUIT CAN GROW

The Brazil nut trees only bear fruit in the original rainforest - an environment that can’t be commercially replicated. Trade from nuts and oil provides an income and helps protect thousands of hectares of the Madre de Dios region of the Amazon rainforest because the trade provides an environmentally friendly alternative to unsustainable income sources. This helps to protect the forest as locals realise it provides a sustainable source of income.

AN INTRICATE ECOSYSTEM

The Brazil nut tree's flowers are pollinated by the female Long-Tongued Orchid Bee - the only insect capable of doing so. The bees use the scent from one specific orchid to attract females. Only one species of animal, a sharp-toothed rodent called the Agouti, can chew through the tough Brazil pod so nuts can be buried to grow new trees. The primary forest has the right balance of trees, orchids and bees that allow the Brazil nut trees to be pollinated.

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